Clare Brown was sacked from BBC for manipulating the 1992 British election

In 1992, Sir Michael Checkland, the BBC’s (then) director general, summoned Clare Rewcastle Brown into his office and got her to sign a declaration stating that she had wilfully exaggerated the contents of some editorials.

That document is currently in the possession of a Tony Blair associate who has since turned against the former British premier.

Suffice to say, once Clare penned her signature, Checkland showed her the door and warned her against having anything to do with the BBC or any of its board members ever again.

Clare is afraid that the evidence will come to light should she mess with the British House of Commons. 

Why else do you think she trained her guns on Najib and not the 36 British MPs who were accused of sexual misconduct right before the 14th Malaysian general election?

THE THIRD FORCE

(republished, first published on 7/11/2017)

Clare Rewcastle Brown is no stranger to Malaysians.

For three or so years prior to the 14th general election (GE14), the Sarawak Report Chief Editor dished out some of the most incredible stories we have read to date. Most of these stories had to do with 1MDB and featured Dato’ Seri Najib Tun Razak as chief protagonist. If he wasn’t a thief, he was a liar. If he wasn’t a liar, he was a skunk.

Whichever way the wheel was spun, the spoke always seemed to face Najib. The Rewcastle philosophy had it that the former premier needed to be brought down if we ever hoped to see a better Malaysia. Had we given him another term, democracy, according to her, would forever have faded beneath the shadow of his guile and the might of his insatiable dictatorship.

Yes, so awe inspired were Malaysians with her twaddle, everyone forgot to ask the billion-dollar question – just what is it that drove this lady? Why would an independent British journalist unattached to major news corporations be that determined to destroy Najib? Would she not have rather punished Tory Members of Parliament (MPs) whose names were floated amid allegations of sexual abuse in Westminster?

The alleged misdemeanors by the “three dirty dozen” first appeared in a dossier compiled by members of the Conservative Party, a party both Clare and her husband, Andrew Brown, were dead against. The Tories and Labour ran multiple investigations into MPs and frontbenchers following claims of sexual misconduct that saw one cabinet minister ejected. So where was Clare in all this?

Why did she not hold a chunk of the British House of Commons accountable for criminal perversity? In a Case Management hearing called on 2nd of August 2017, a London court rejected her defense by ruling that Najib was not the criminally perverse person she claimed he was. So why did she still insist on scandalizing this one man when she had a whole zoo of British MPs to tear apart on home ground?

Well, the answer is simple – she can’t.

If she were to so much as comment on the Westminster Sexual Scandal, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) would immediately release a document proving that she conspired with her husband to manipulate the 1992 British election. Then an investigative journalist, Clare undertook to fabricate evidence against Labour MPs she felt would prevent her brother in-law, Gordon Brown, from advancing his own career towards premiership of the United Kingdom (UK).

It all began in 1983, when a young and ambitious Clare Rewcastle Brown took on a secretarial job with the BBC. Around then, she got acquainted with a private eye named Joseph Drake who began feeding her information that was damaging to the reputation of British politicians. Whenever her boss needed a scoop, she would be the first to turn up at his office with “smoking gun” evidence that seemed absolutely incriminating against some MP or other.

Late in 1986, the then director general of the BBC, Alasdair David Gordon Milne, began taking notice of her and assigned a private eye to follow her around. A month later, news of her associations with Drake and an intelligence whistleblower named Arthur Wilkinson was made known to Alastair. In January 1987, just as the BBC director general was about to strike on Clare, he was forced out of the news corp by the then Prime Minister of the UK, Margaret Thatcher.

The person who triggered Thatcher’s discovery into Alastair’s affairs was none other than Andrew Brown. Then a script writer with the BBC, Andrew sought the assistance of his brother, Gordon Brown, to feed Thatcher’s private secretary with some documentary evidence that Clare obtained from Wilkinson. Just so that you know, Gordon was then a Member of Parliament representing the Labour Party in Dunfermline East.

Among the documents Gordon handed over to Thatcher’s secretary were money trails linking Alastair to Thatcher’s predecessor, Leonard James Callaghan. As the story goes, Callaghan was feeding the BBC with information that was damaging against Thatcher’s government. The former Labour premier undertook in a quid pro quo with John Major to subvert the then upcoming British elections to ruin Thatcher’s chance of being re-elected. When Thatcher was told of this, she made it her priority to see to it that Alastair was removed by hook or by crook.

With Alastair gone, Thatcher made very sure that Andrew was rewarded for his efforts. Later that year, she tasked the new BBC director general, Sir Michael Checkland, to promote Andrew “to a senior position” and work closely with him to “keep the conservative theme wafting above the news desks.” Now, despite being a staunch advocate of Labour policies, Andrew didn’t seem to have much of a problem with that.

As a matter of fact, neither did Gordon, who told his brother to get better acquainted with Clare and squeeze every ounce of dirt he could on Neil Kinnock, (then) the leader of the Labour party. The plan was to throw Kinnock under the bus to pave the way for John Smith to succeed him. Smith promised Gordon the role of Shadow Chancellor of Exchequer in a Shadow Cabinet he planned to establish subject to the success of the coup attempt.

However, things didn’t work out quite as Gordon had planned them. Both of Clare’s deep throats – Drake and Wilkinson – refused to play any role in the coup attempt and told her that the establishment they were tied to strictly needed Kinnock to keep the top job. Seeing no alternative, Clare decided to make known to Andrew – who was then in the midst of courting her – what she had been doing all this while.

According to her, much of the documentary evidence she presented Alastair with was heavily exaggerated, and in some cases, fabricated. She added, that while Drake and Wilkinson afforded her the luxury of cross-checking any information that was damning against any individual, when a piece of the puzzle did not fit, she would tweak documents or outright fabricate them just to keep her stories from being interrupted. Now, if you’re thinking that Andrew was pissed with what he heard, you’re dead wrong.

He was delighted.

As a matter of fact, he charted a course for her to rig the 1992 British election in Gordon’s favour. One thing led to another before Checkland (the then BBC director general) eventually discovered that Clare’s stories were creating ripples in the Labour front and dissatisfaction among Tony Blair’s men. In January 1992, a group of 10 Labour MPs invited Checkland to a closed-door meeting that was attended also by one of Blair’s associates.

During the meeting, the MPs presented Checkland with cut-and-dry proof of Clare’s involvement with a group of syndicated criminals based in the Falklands. According to them, the group was using her to undermine the BBC by turning it into a platform to advance Gordon’s career. Checkland was given a choice – either give Clare the boot or make public the BBC’s decade long involvement in acts of subversion against British democracy.

The very next day, Checkland summoned Clare into his office and got her to sign a declaration stating that she had wilfully exaggerated the contents of some editorials. That document is currently in the possession of Blair’s associate who has since turned against the former British premier. Suffice to say, once Clare penned her signature, Checkland showed her to the door and warned her against having anything to do with the BBC or any of its board members ever again.

Gordon’s decision to work with Blair caused many British MPs to conditionally withdraw their petitions against Clare. To ensure that Gordon would stay in line with his mission, Blair handed a copy of the declaration Clare signed and evidence that incriminated her to his associate for ‘safekeeping’. Back then, the said associate was a staunch Blair proponent and someone Blair referred to as his “brother in arms.”

But in August 2017, they turned bitter rivals.

And it is this rivalry that allowed me to sight some of the evidence Clare fabricated back in the eighties. The Sarawak Report Chief Editor is afraid that the evidence will come to light should she mess with the British House of Commons. Why else do you think she trained her guns on Najib and not the 36 British MPs who were accused of sexual misconduct?

Now how’s that for a story?

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