What about the immigrants in Sabah granted ICs in exchange for votes?

How can a man who dished out hundreds of thousands of ICs to foreigners in Sabah in exchange for their votes be trusted to lead a transparent government? Source (pic): TTF

TTF: Deputy Home Minister Datuk Mohd Azis Jamman announced that changing addresses on identification cards will soon require supporting documents such as utility bills and quit rent receipt (see news item below).

According to him, the move was to avoid problems of inaccurate information on identity cards after such cases in which “50 to 100 people” had the same address.

As good as the move may be, this guy is serving under the government of Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, a man who happened also to serve as Prime Minister from 1981 to 2003.

Under Mahathir’s previous watch, the Government of Malaysia (GoM) quietly granted citizenship to immigrants in Sabah in exchange for their votes.

Ten years into retirement, on the 17th of January 2013, Mahathir defended the granting of those citizenships as “lawful” and denied knowledge of any political considerations.

However, in December 2017, months ahead of the 14th general election, he admitted that the move was a politically motivated “mistake” but stopped short of apologising for it.

And here we have Mohd Aziz telling us that the GoM is determined to keep things “black and white” insofar as addresses on ICs go.

So who’s going to assure us that the GoM will no longer grant ICs to foreigners to secure the DAP’s strongholds in Malaysia?

Is the GoM willing to serve us with the complete list of foreigners – which currently is in the possession of a person I know – granted citizenships by Mahathir back in the eighties and nineties?


KUALA LUMPUR: Changing addresses on identification cards will soon require supporting documents such as utility bills and quit rent receipt.

Bernama reported that this new ruling will come into force May 2.

Deputy Home Minister Datuk Mohd Azis Jamman said the move was to avoid problems of inaccurate information on identity cards after such cases in which “50 to 100 people” had the same address.


“There are addresses where the area is just an empty plot of land with no house. We do not want these things to repeat,” he was quoted as saying at a press conference in Putrajaya today.

Using inaccurate addresses would lead to difficulties in matters that involve government agencies such as the Election Commission (EC) when it comes to voter registration as well as tracking down individuals in police investigations.

For those renting homes, they have to produce their rental agreement or rental receipt as well as other documents to prove they are in fact residing at this new address.

He informed that those who failed to produce such documents, they would need to obtain a confirmation letter from either a penghulu, village head, homeowner, members of Parliament or employers to support the application for a change of address.

Adapted from:

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